Browsing articles tagged with " osteoporosis"

Fall Prevention

Dec 30, 2011   //   by soon   //   Orthopaedic Article  //  No Comments

Falls can happen anytime and any place to people of any age, but most falls by people 50 years of age and older have higher chances of fracturing their bone. The number of falls and the severity of injury resulting from falls increases as people get older. The most common serious injuries are head injuries, wrist fractures, spine fractures, and hip fractures.

What to do if you fall

  • Don’t panic. Assess the situation and determine if you are hurt.
  • Slide or crawl along the floor to the nearest couch or chair and try to get up.
  • If you can’t get up, call for help.
  • If you are alone, crawl slowly to the telephone and call 995

Personal Risk Factors

Personal risk factors account for approximately 75% of the risk of falls and are related to acquired disabilities, age-related changes and current diseases.

  • Age. The rate of hip fractures increases after age 50, doubling every five to six years.
  • Activity. Lack of weight-bearing exercise leads to decreased bone strength.
  • Gender. Reduced levels of estrogen after female menopause can result in osteoporosis. Women have two to three times as many hip fractures as men and a 20% chance of a hip fracture during their lifetime.
  • Habits. Smoking and/or excessive alcohol intake decreases bone strength.
  • Heredity. Caucasians and Asians with small, slender body structures are at risk; so are people who have a family history of fractures later in life.
  • Nutrition. Low calcium dietary intake, reduced calcium absorption and inadequate vitamin D are factors in osteoporosis.

Prevention Factors

  • Get an annual physical and eye examination, particularly an evaluation of cardiac and blood pressure problems.
  • Maintain a diet with adequate dietary calcium and vitamin D.
  • Participate in an exercise program for agility, strength, balance, and coordination.
  • Keep an up-to-date list of all medications and provide it to all doctors with whom you consult.
  • Know the side effects of your medications.
  • Make sure all medications are clearly labeled and stored in a well-lit area according to instructions.
  • Take medications on schedule with a full glass of water, unless otherwise instructed.

Osteoporosis

Nov 10, 2011   //   by soon   //    //  No Comments

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis

What is Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a disease that deteriorate bone mineral density and tissue which leads to increased bone fragility and risk of fracture. Osteoporosis is often known as “the silent killer” because bone loss occurs without any symptoms. Bone is composed of protein, collagen and calcium which give bone its strength and durability. Bones that are affected by osteoporosis can break with just a minor injury that normally would not cause a bone to fracture. The fracture can be either in the form of cracking or collapsing. The spine, hips, ribs, and wrists are common areas of bone fractures from osteoporosis.


Symptoms of Osteoporosis

There is no symptoms for the disease. Only through early detection of scans or frequent bone fracture you are able actually able to determine you are suffering from it.


Causes of Osteoporosis

  • Female gender
  • Thin and small body frame
  • Family history of osteoporosis
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Lack of exercise
  • Diet low in calcium
  • Poor nutrition and poor general health

 


Treatment for Osteoporosis

  • Changes of life style
  • Medication that increase bone strength, calcium supplement

 


Self-Diagnose can bring more harm than treating it. It is good to know more about the injury but definitely not to the point of self-treatment. It will be much safer to get treated by Our Doctor, for more information or to book an appointment with Singapore Sports and Orthopaedic Clinic, you can call (+65) 6471 2691, the hotline is open 24 hours. You may also send us an enquiry for appointment or question about osteoporosis.

 

Total Hip Replacement

Jun 2, 2011   //   by soon   //    //  No Comments

Total Hip Replacement

total-hip-replacement

What is Total Hip Replacement?

A Total Hip Replacement is a surgical procedure whereby the cartilage and bone of the hip joint is surgically replaced with artificial materials. The normal hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The socket is a “cup-shaped” bone of the pelvis called the acetabulum. The ball is the head of the thigh bone. Total hip joint replacement involves surgical removal of the ball and socket and replacing them with a metal ball and stem inserted into the femur bone and an artificial plastic cup socket.


Common Causes of Hip Pain and Loss of Hip Function

  • Osteoarthritis usually occurs in people 50 years of age and older and often with a family history of arthritis. The cartilage that cushions the bones of the knee softens and wears away due to wear and tear. The bones then rub against one another, causing knee pain and stiffness.

 

  • Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease in which the synovial membrane becomes thickened and inflamed, producing too much synovial fluid that overfills the joint space. This inflammation can damage the cartilage and eventually cause cartilage loss, pain, and stiffness.

 

  • Traumatic arthritis can follow a serious knee injury. A knee fracture or severe tears of the knee ligaments may damage the articular cartilage over time, causing knee pain and limiting knee function.

 


Is Total Hip Replacement for you?

You may benefit from hip replacement surgery if:

  • Hip pain limits your everyday activities such as walking or bending
  • Hip pain continues while resting, either day or night
  • Stiffness in a hip limits your ability to move or lift your leg
  • You have little pain relief from anti-inflammatory drugs
  • You have harmful or unpleasant side effects from your hip medications
  • Other treatments such as physical therapy do not relieve hip pain

 


Sign and Symptoms of Blood Clot

When there is blood cot in the legs:

  • Pain in your calf and leg
  • Tenderness on your calf
  • Swelling of your thigh, calf, ankle, or foot

When there is blood cot in the lungs:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain when breathing

Notify your doctor immediately if you develop any of these signs.

Total Knee Replacement

May 29, 2011   //   by soon   //    //  No Comments

Total Knee Replacement

total-knee-replacement

What is Total Knee Replacement?

A Total Knee Replacement is a surgical procedure whereby the knee joint is replaced with artificial material. The knee is a hinge joint which provides motion at the point where the thigh meets the lower leg. During a total knee replacement, the end of the femur bone is removed and replaced with a metal shell. The end of the lower leg bone is also removed and replaced with a channeled plastic piece with a metal stem. Depending on the condition of the kneecap portion of the knee joint, a plastic “button” may also be added under the kneecap surface.

Common Causes of Knee Pain and Loss of Knee Function

  • Osteoarthritis usually occurs in people 50 years of age and older and often with a family history of arthritis. The cartilage that cushions the bones of the knee softens and wears away due to wear and tear. The bones then rub against one another, causing knee pain and stiffness.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease in which the synovial membrane becomes thickened and inflamed, producing too much synovial fluid that overfills the joint space. This inflammation can damage the cartilage and eventually cause cartilage loss, pain, and stiffness.
  • Traumatic arthritis can follow a serious knee injury. A knee fracture or severe tears of the knee ligaments may damage the articular cartilage over time, causing knee pain and limiting knee function.

 


Is Total Knee Replacement for You?

Total knee replacement surgery is considered for patients whose knee joints have been damaged by either progressive arthritis, trauma, or other rare destructive diseases of the joint. The most common reason for knee replacement in the United States is severe osteoarthritis of the knees. Decisions regarding whether or when to undergo knee replacement surgery are not easy. Patients should understand the risks as well as the benefits before making these decisions.


What are the risk of Total Knee Replacement?

Risks of total knee replacement include blood clots in the legs that can travel to the lungs. Pulmonary embolism can cause shortness of breath, chest pain, and even shock. Other risks include urinary tract infection, nausea and vomiting, chronic knee pain and stiffness, bleeding into the knee joint, nerve damage, blood vessel injury, and infection of the knee which may require re-operation.


Sign and Symptoms of Blood Clot

When there is blood cot in the legs:

  • Increasing pain and swelling in your calf, ankle and foot
  • Tenderness around your knee

When there is blood clot in your lung:

  • Sudden increased shortness of breath
  • Sudden onset of chest pain
  • Chest pain with coughing

Notify your doctor immediately if you develop any of these signs.